Friday, November 11, 2011

Patt Morrison for Monday, November 14, 2011

PATT MORRISON SCHEDULE

Monday, November 14, 2011

1-3 p.m.

 

CALL-IN @ 866-893-5722, 866-893-KPCC; OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ONLINE ON THE PATT MORRISON BLOG AT KPCC-DOT-ORG

 

1:00-1:40: OPEN

 

1:41:30 – 1:58:30

Oliver Sacks on the mysteries of the mind

Distinguished neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has transformed our understanding of the human mind through his writings about the far boundaries of neurological experience. He joins Patt with stories of some remarkable characters who’ve suffered some form of neurological damage, including Howard, a novelist who loses the ability to read; Pat, who manages to communicate ever after a stroke deprives her of speech; and finally, himself, and the strange ocular symptoms he encountered in his own battle with an eye tumor.

 

Guest:

Dr. Oliver Sacks, professor of neurology and psychiatry at Columbia University; author of The Mind’s Eye Musicophilia, and The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat

 

2:06 – 2:30

Up in the air, but for a (higher) price: flying nightmare for holiday travelers

Once upon a time, travelers with children were allowed to board first. Those children were also able to peek inside the cockpit. Since the decline of the great American airline industry, travelers continue to face downgrades – especially this holiday season. The Air Transport Association expects 23.2 million Americans to fly in the days before and after Thanksgiving, which is down 2 percent from last year. Furthermore, airlines are cutting capacity for available flights while increasing airfare. As airlines continue to struggle financially from labor costs, industry consolidation and skyrocketing jet fuel prices, in-flight amenities become onboard perks. What changes have you noticed in your travels this holiday season? Is traveling with your family a nightmare? Which airlines are do you prefer? Should airlines be more considerate to their customers?

 

Guests:

NOT CONFIRMED:

Charlie Leocha, director Consumer Travel Alliance

 

2:30-2:40: OPEN

 

2:41:30 – 2:58:30

What would it take to get you to bike?

A first-of-its-kind study from the University of Wisconsin found that if people switched from cars to bikes for just half of their short trips (5 miles or less), it would save a net societal health benefit of $3.5 billion in increased air quality, and $3.8 billion in savings from smaller health care costs—annually. The study took into consideration data on air pollution, car accidents, physical fitness and mortality rates for eleven metropolitan cities in the upper Midwest. The results are staggering, but could similar outcomes be expected in the Southland? There are perhaps fewer “short trips,” longer commutes, and smog. Still, could collective savings of that magnitude convince you to ditch the wheel on half your short drives?

 

Guests:

NOT CONFIRMED:

Jonthan Patz, physician and professor of Environmental Studies & Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin and co-author of the study

Jefferey Rosenhall, director, Health Transportation Network, California Department of Public Health

 

Study: http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info%3Adoi%2F10.1289%2Fehp.1103440

 

 

 

Lauren Osen

Southern California Public Radio - 89.3 KPCC

626-583-5173 / 626-483-5278

losen@scpr.org @Patt_Morrison

 

1 comment:

Alvaro said...

Completely useful..good source, thanks anyway!