Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Patt Morrison for Thursday, July 1, 2010

PATT MORRISON SCHEDULE

Thursday, July 1, 2010

1-3 p.m.

 

CALL-IN @ 866-893-5722, 866-893-KPCC; OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ONLINE ON THE PATT MORRISON BLOG AT KPCC-DOT-ORG

 

1:06 – 1:19

OPEN

 

 

1:21 – 1:39

Bridging the digital divide: can broadband internet be brought to the masses?

On Monday President Obama signed a memorandum committing the government to dramatically expanding broadband access, ostensibly easing the use of electronic equipment ranging from cell phones to laptop computers.  While this is cheery news for the already wired-up among us looking for more bandwidth, and while it’s ultimately a good thing for telecommunication companies, there are still dramatic number of Americans who do not have access to dial-up or highspeed internet.  Here in California bolstering the broadband network is a matter of both economic and social importance, as the more computers in the state that are hooked up to the internet means better information sharing and more job creation.  Most politicians and technocrats talk a good game about creating universal access to broadband but much work remains to be done—can we bridge the digital divide?

 

Guests:

Norm Mineta, former Congressman & Secretary of Transportation & Commerce; head of a California Emerging Technology Fund advisory board on broadband access

IN STUDIO

Backup:  Steve Getzug, 310-633-9444; cell, 213-219-8990

 

Sunne McPeak, president & CEO of the California Emerging Technology Fund

IN STUDIO

 

 

1:41 – 1:58:30

OPEN

 

 

 

2:06 – 2:30

Should there be a right to discriminate?  Debating the ramifications of Supreme Court’s “Christian Fellowship” decision

The Supreme Court’s decision in the case of Hastings Christian Fellowship vs. Martinez, focusing on a Christian group’s right to be recognized by the UCSF Hastings School of Law, seems pretty straightforward.  The court sided with the decision of Hastings Law School to deny the Christian Legal Society “registered organization status,” based on the fellowship’s exclusion of gay members.  The Court ruled that Hastings’ refusal of official status was a reasonable application of the school’s nondiscrimination policy.  However, by ruling that “all-comers” must be accepted has the court inadvertently paved the way for student run Jewish groups to be mandated to accept Neo-Nazi’s?  Is the 1st Amendment actually aided by a logical amount of discrimination?

 

Guests:

Mike McGough, Senior Editorial Writer for the Los Angeles Times, author of the editorial disagreeing with the Court’s decision

HE CALLS US:

 

Leo Martinez, Acting Chancellor and Dean (until midnight tonight), Professor of Law, Hastings University

CALL HIM @

 

Walter Dellinger, Chair of the Appellate Practice at O'Melveny, heads the Harvard/O’Melveny Supreme Court and Appellate Practice Clinic, and is a Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard University

CALL HIM @

 

 

 

2:30 – 2:58:30

The Beauty Bias: the injustice of appearance in life and law

Should there be a law protecting the fat, the unattractive or the short people of America?  Is it prejudice to ridicule a female employee or a Supreme Court Justice nominee for being too ugly?  In the age of Botox, plastic surgery gone overboard, and the undying trend of youth, professional women face a bigger obstacle than equal pay.  As Deborah L. Rhode explains in her book “The Beauty Bias: the injustice of appearance in life and law,” more and more Americans are filing discrimination complaints related to appearance, but many people don’t see this type of discrimination as infringing on our fundamental rights.  How can feminism prevail over this type of prejudice when even the staunchest feminists surrender to wrinkle creams?

 

Guest:

Deborah L. Rhode, director of the Stanford Center on the Legal Profession and Ernest W. McFarland professor of law at Stanford Law School; former president of the Association of American Law Schools and law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall; Rhode is the author of 20 books, including “Women and Leadership” and her newest book, “The Beauty Bias”

CALL HER @

 

 

 

Jonathan Serviss

Producer, Patt Morrison Program

Southern California Public Radio

NPR Affiliate for Los Angeles

89.3 KPCC-FM | 89.1 KUOR-FM | 90.3 KPCV-FM

626.583.5171, office

415.497.2131, mobile

jserviss@kpcc.org / jserviss@scpr.org

www.scpr.org

 

1 comment:

芸茂 said...

一個人的價值,應該看他貢獻了什麼,而不是他取得了什麼.................................................................