Friday, July 9, 2010

Patt Morrison for Monday, July 12, 2010

PATT MORRISON SCHEDULE

Monday, July 12, 2010

1-3 p.m.

 

CALL-IN @ 866-893-5722, 866-893-KPCC; OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ONLINE ON THE PATT MORRISON BLOG AT KPCC-DOT-ORG

 

 

1:06 – 1:19

OPEN

 

 

1:21 – 1:39

Canaries in the economic coal mine—why small businesses still aren’t hiring

 

Guest:

Susan Woodward, economist & director of the Intuit Small Business Employment Index

 

 

 

1:41 – 1:58:30

David Kilcullen “Counterinsurgency”

Against a backdrop of two wars for which the American public has grown weary and increasingly hopeless, the U.S. military has generated some more petty, almost gossip-like media attention in the past several months, from lifting the veil on its internal ruminations on Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, to the embarrassing resignation of its top general in Afghanistan and a reshuffling of command.  The media attention may have done more to steer attention away from the wars, but serious obstacles remain in both.  Military strategist and advisor David Kilcullen joins Patt with a behind-the-scenes analysis of where to go next.  A former adviser to General David Petraeus in Iraq and to General Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan, Kilcullen’s knowledge of modern warfare influenced the 2007 surge in Iraq and many contemporary military leaders.  In his new book “Counterinsurgency,” Kilcullen delves into the mind of a military strategist, defining both counterinsurgency and counterterrorism tactics and laying out his views on the current situation in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere. 

 

Guest:

David Kilcullen, currently an adviser to NATO and former Senior Counterinsurgency Adviser to General David Petraeus in Iraq and adviser to General Stanley McChrystal in Afghanistan; adjunct professor of security studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a fellow at the Center for New American Security; author of “The Accidental Guerilla: Fighting Small Wars in the Midst of a Big One”

IN-STUDIO

 

 

2:06 – 2:30

Alzheimer’s Association convenes international conference

Alzheimer's disease, a complex degenerative brain disorder, is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people globally by 2050, and with an increasing aging population, is set to become one of the most costly diseases to the United States, currently estimated at about $100 billion a year.  This week, the Alzheimer's Association convenes an International Conference (ICAD) to look at the latest research on diagnosing, treating and preventing the disease.  While many sufferers of dementia are assumed to have developed Alzheimer’s, the disease can only be officially diagnosed in an autopsy.   On this week’s agenda are developments that could become the first-ever test to diagnose living patients, as well as analyses of the cost of burden to a healthy society of caregivers who will increasingly be linked to Alzheimer’s sufferers. 

 

Guest:

Dr. Daniel Chain, founder of Intellect Neuroscience; Alzheimer’s researcher

HE CALLS US:

 

UNCONFIRMED

Harry Johns, president & CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association

CALL HIM:

 

2:30 – 2:39

OPEN

 

 

2:41 – 2:58:30

To Kill A Mockingbird turns 50

Harper Lee’s classic about a courtroom drama in the segregated South turned fifty yesterday.  The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936. This gave the book an unprecedented real feel and hit very close to home for some, maybe too close. Few books have ever achieved the success of To Kill a Mockingbird and few have ever gained the same amount of controversy. The book's racial slurs, profanity, and frank discussion of rape have led people to challenge its appropriateness in libraries and classrooms, but is widely credited with being an American classic. Whether you hate it or love it, one thing is for sure, from Boo Radley to Atticus and Scout, Harper Lee’s characters and story have impacted generations.

 

Guest:

TBD

 

 

 

Jonathan Serviss

Producer, Patt Morrison Program

Southern California Public Radio

NPR Affiliate for Los Angeles

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626.583.5171, office

415.497.2131, mobile

jserviss@kpcc.org / jserviss@scpr.org

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