Friday, April 2, 2010

Patt Morrison for Monday, April 5, 2010

PATT MORRISON SCHEDULE

Monday, April 5, 2010

1-3 p.m.

 

CALL-IN @ 866-893-5722, 866-893-KPCC; OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ONLINE ON THE PATT MORRISON BLOG AT KPCC-DOT-ORG

 

 

1:06 – 1:39

OPEN

 

 

1:41 – 1:58:30

This is your pilot speaking: thanks to the FAA & Prozac my mood is now at 30,000 feet

It’s one of many disconcerting things that passengers could hear as they’re stepping onto an airplane:  unfortunately your pilot is feeling a little depressed today.  Under old Federal Aviation Administration regulations pilots that were taking antidepressants were not allowed to fly, but on Monday some pilots on Prozac will be back behind the controls under a new policy.  The initial concern was that older versions of antidepressants caused drowsiness—usually not a desirable condition in pilots—but that modern drugs don’t inflict sleepiness on many of its users.  Regardless it was thought that many pilots lied about their use of antidepressants to avoid being grounded.  All of which begs the question:  would you rather be in a plane flown by a sleepy pilot or a depressed pilot?

 

Guests:

NOT CONFIRMED – DO NOT PROMOTE THESE GUESTS:

Representative of Airline Pilots Association

Representative of the FAA

 

CONFIRMED:

Patrick Smith, an airline pilot, air travel columnist and author.  Patrick has visited more than 70 countries and always asks for a window seat.  .

CALL HIM:

 

 

2:06 – 2:30

Homosexuality in animals… does it affect what humans see as natural?

Homosexuality has long been a taboo around the world. Some say it’s a natural occurrence and some insist it’s a choice. Recent studies on animals have revealed same-sex sexual activity in more than 450 species, from fish to birds to mammals. Is it homosexuality as we define it, and what does this phenomenon say about human homosexuality, if anything? The question is explored in the cover article of yesterday’s New York Times Magazine, in which a new study on homosexual behavior among albatrosses in Hawaii frames the issue. 

 

Guests:

Jon Mooallem, writer of Can Animals Be Gay?,” the cover story of yesterday’s New York Times Magazine

CALL HIM: 

 

Paul Vasey, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada.

CALL HIM:

 

 

2:30 – 2:58:30

Annie Leonard’s “Story of Stuff”—how to use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without

Stuff. We’ve got a lot of it, we don’t share it well, and some of it is even toxic. Annie Leonard first tackled the story of stuff in her online “Story of Stuff” video, which went viral a few years ago. The simple cartoon explained the processes our stuff goes through on its journey from natural resource, to product, to waste.  Now, for those who care to dig deeper, she’s adding a book component.  “The Story of Stuff,” the book, is a fast-paced expos√© on the hidden environmental and social costs of our current systems of production and consumption and further explores the negative impact that our current “take, make, waste” philosophy has on our lives and our planet.  

 

Guests:

Annie Leonard, a TIME magazine Hero of the Environment and author of “The Story of Stuff: How our obsession with stuff is trashing the planet, out communities, and our health—and a vision for change”

IN STUDIO

 

 

Jonathan Serviss

Producer, Patt Morrison Program

Southern California Public Radio

NPR Affiliate for Los Angeles

89.3 KPCC-FM | 89.1 KUOR-FM | 90.3 KPCV-FM

626.583.5171, office

415.497.2131, mobile

jserviss@kpcc.org / jserviss@scpr.org

www.scpr.org

 

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