Friday, August 20, 2010

Patt Morrison for Monday, August 23, 2010

PATT MORRISON SCHEDULE

Monday, August 23, 2010

1-3 p.m.

 

CALL-IN @ 866-893-5722, 866-893-KPCC; OR JOIN THE CONVERSATION ONLINE ON THE PATT MORRISON BLOG AT KPCC-DOT-ORG

 

ALEX COHEN FILLS IN FOR PATT

 

1:06 – 1:19

OPEN

 

 

1:21 – 1:39

Is Google TV the future?

Imagine a world where you can watch anything you want anytime you want.  Enter Google.  The famous search engine wants to revolutionize the way we watch TV.   It’s called, surprise, surprise, Google TV.   The user would have to buy a special TV or a set-top box and a keyboard (the iPhone and Android phone work as well).  The technology would give the user access to any TV show or movie in Google’s limitless storage capacity.  The only hitch is Google TV needs content.  Enter the big Hollywood movie studios.  They haven’t been willing to hand over their vast libraries of programs.  Why? Because it’s unclear how they will profit off the deal.  Google TV may be ad free (unlike Hulu or some of the other internet sites).  Some industry executives worry that consumers may opt out of their cable and satellite subscriptions if they can watch TV for free on the internet.  Hmmm…free TV or pay a cable bill?

 

Guests:

Alex Ben Block, editor-at-large, Hollywood Reporter

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  • The industry is very skeptical and so far no one has agreed to provide Google with content.  How can the major studios operate if their content is free?
  • The Hollywood Reporter is an entertainment industry trade publication.

 

Barton Crockett, media analyst, Lazard Capital Markets

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  • Internet video will be the biggest thing to happen in the living room since the advent of digital video recorders. He predicts that within five years television sets and set-top boxes that connect to the Web will be commonplace. 
  • Lazard Capital Markets is a growth-oriented full service broker-dealer.  They provide proprietary research, which is based on deep domain expertise in the Healthcare, Consumer, Energy, Technology and Transportation sectors. 

UNCONFIRMED

Representative from Google

 

 

 

1:41 – 1:58:30

The Tillman Story

You may remember the story of Pat Tillman, the bright, young professional football player from the Arizona Cardinals who chose to give up his career to join the Army Rangers shortly after 9/11. He was instantly lauded for his patriotism and willingness to sacrifice success at professional sports for the likes of a barracks and the desert of Afghanistan. Then, in 2004, Tillman was killed by friendly fire in the hills of Afghanistan, though the government initially claimed he and his unit had been ambushed by insurgent forces. A new documentary delves into the truth behind Pat Tillman's life, service and untimely death. Director Amir Bar-Lev is here to discuss the film and its themes of service, mourning, and true American heroism.

 

Guest:

Amir Bar-Lev, director of “The Tillman Story”

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2:06 – 2:30

Islamophobia in America

A new poll from TIME finds that 46% of Americans believe Islam is more likely than other faiths to encourage violence against nonbelievers.  More head scratching, the same poll found that 24% of Americans believe that Barack Obama is a Muslim, which is actually an increase from his election year 2008. Is Islam a religion of hatred and war, as Billy Graham’s son, Franklin Graham, says, or has a post 9/11 fear of anti-American violence stoked Islamophobia and brought it into the mainstream? We talk with TIME’s Deputy International Editor, Bobbie Ghosh, about the rising fear of Islam in this country.

 

Guest:

Bobbie Ghosh, Deputy International Editor for TIME; he is their former Baghdad bureau chief

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Edina Lekovic, Director of Policy & Programming for the Muslim Public Affairs Council
IN STUDIO

 

 

2:30 – 2:58:30

Justine Sharrock’s “Tortured: When Good Soldiers Do Bad Things”
After the leaked photos of abused Abu Ghraib prisoners circulated throughout every media channel in 2004, a political scandal ensued with high-ranking officials denying the U.S. committed any sort of illegal torture in their interrogation tactics.  Recent accusations include the army’s use of waterboarding on foreign prisoners.  But while Karl Rove called waterboarding “appropriate” in the war on terrorism, the soldiers who worked at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo have the psychological scars that say otherwise.  Justine Sharrock’s “Tortured: When Good Soldiers Do Bad Things” reveals the inner torment of four American soldiers, who followed orders from the top to maintain an atmosphere of fear and to torture.  They were told their actions were legal and for their country.  So who is to blame for the torture?  The soldiers who did as they were told or the politicians and top officials who orchestrated legal loopholes? 

 

Guest:

Justine Sharrock, investigative journalist and contributor to Mother Jones, Salon, and San Francisco Chronicle

IN-STUDIO

 

Brandon Neely, former Army military police officer who served in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and Iraq

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Jonathan Serviss

Producer, Patt Morrison Program

Southern California Public Radio

NPR Affiliate for Los Angeles

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626.583.5171, office

415.497.2131, mobile

jserviss@kpcc.org / jserviss@scpr.org

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